Connect with us

Culture

Pretty Good Copy (Writing)

Published

on

There’s one skill I wish I had learned in my 20s. This skill would have made me an additional millions in the past decade. At least. And probably much more.

This skill, which you can’t learn in any college and university, is Copywriting.

Copywriting isn’t like copyright law. Copy writing is writing ad copy.

Now one problem with learning copywriting is that most people purporting to teach it haven’t actually sold products other than their copywriting courses. They post fake screen shots of income earning for gullible rubes. It’s a shame that 90% of copywriters are giving the other 10% a bad name.

And courses drag you into the weeds on “perfect” copy. But unless your business runs at scale (i.e., it’s massive, and even 1 or 2% optimizations translates into major sales), you don’t need perfect copy.

You need Pretty Good Copy.

What’s pretty good copy? I just made that term up, although someone else has probably used it before. I Googled it and didn’t get any results.

Copy is designed for one goal and one goal only – to get a person to answer a call to action.

A call to action could be:

  • making a sale,
  • promoting an event,
  • getting a person to join your email list,
  • getting out the vote,
  • getting a person to call his congresswoman,
  • returning to your website to read you again.

Copywriting is used by campaigns, fundraisers, and small business owners. You don’t see it as much in big business, as copywriting is a reclusive business. The best people in the business charge a lot, and usually keep a small roster of clients. What you see on TV is “marketing” and glitz, not copy.

Pretty Good Copy hits all six principles of persuasion:

  • Reciprocity,
  • Scarcity,
  • Authority,
  • Consistency,
  • Liking,
  • Consensus.

Why do sales end soon (scarcity) and included testimonials (consensus)? Because those are two proven principles of persuasion.

Authority is demonstrated. If you’re selling fitness products, you show off your body. You also show authority in subtle ways, for example web design. (My site is less persuasive because it’s simple. However my readers here are niche and know me. If I wanted to expand, I’d redesign it.)

You can see Pretty Good Copy in this article I sent today.

It begins:

Amazon Prime Day is a “hallmark holiday,” but that’s never stopped me from shamelessly promoting the best products on the market. Today at the Gorilla Mind store you save 25% off when you enter GP25 at checkout here.

I hit the liking principles by mildly self-deprecating and scarcity by noting the sale ends today. People don’t like to feel like they are being sold, so just put it out there that you are selling them. People like this approach.

I hit authority in an unusual way in the next paragraph. Can you spot it?

Our prices are already far lower than what you’ll find elsewhere. I challenge you to compare the skincare product to what you’ll find at Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, or a spa. Their products are between $30 and $100. You can buy a 3 pack of Youth for under $30.

Although you may consciously notice the value proposition, I immediately have you comparing Gorilla Mind products to what you find in outlets like Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods. Everyone knows those companies have good products, and you breezed right past that line without realizing you’re putting all three businesses in the same category.

Reciprocity kicks in here:

Gorilla Mind is working on building trust with you by offering top products at below what you’d find anywhere else.

Do you understand why? You’re being told (and it’s true) that you’re getting top products far below market value. You’re basically getting something for free. This triggers the reciprocity principle.

Authority is also demonstrated on this line:

Gorilla Mind hasn’t bought a single ad either. The company’s focus is to grow organically, one customer at a time.

A company that doesn’t have to buy ads must be a good one, right?

Consistency means you want to live up your vision of yourself. This can be high-minded (“I’m the type of person who votes,” and thus a voter drive would have you sign a pledge to vote) or more ordinary, as in this case:

As I’ve said many times, I have no shame in asking for your business. Gorilla Mind makes great products, and you use great products, so why not use Gorilla Mind’s products?

You’re already using products. Why not use these other products? That’s the consistency principle. You’re only being to asked to do something that you already do (or intend to do).

Consensus kicks in with the testimonials.

– “Man, my brain works on overdrive and my face is getting more handsome.”

– “I got this for myself. My girlfriend has since seemingly commandeered it from me. It appears she likes it more than me.”

– “I’ve been taking Gorilla Mind Smooth for one week to see if it’s b.s. or not. All I’ll say is this… I’ve been able to sit still and focus and write one hour a day consistently. I never do that.”

I selected the line about “my girlfriend took my products” as it overcomes a common objection. Can women use the skincare products? Yes of course. Women who aren’t breast feeding or nursing can use the other products, too, although Gorilla Dream is the second best seller for women after the skincare line.

Pretty Good Copy is not Perfect Copy.

There’s a lot to critique about my copy, and a professional copywriter who wanted you to impress you would rip it apart.

There aren’t enough pictures. A video should autoplay. The copy should be longer. (Good copy is often 10,000+ words.) Each testimonial should have a human face next to it. There should be an email opt-in for people who don’t want to buy right now. This email opt-in should retarget users with a coupon or offer. Etc.

Except I wrote the offer in 15 minutes, and spend less than an hour on this article. Which, if you re-read it, you’ll notice is its own form of copywriting. (Meta.)

When you launch a signature product, that’s when you need better than Pretty Good Copy.

How many “experts” can write persuasive sales copy as an afterthought?

And unlike most “experts,” I’ve done the impossible and sold a lot of books.

(Books are the worst business to be in.)

Who do I recommend for copywriting advice?

I don’t sell copywriting services or courses.

This article was entirely educational, as it’s something young people need to learn.

It’s a skill I wish I had learned, and it’s a skill you’ll learn in my next book.

Yes, there is another book coming out soon.

P.S. You have a couple of more hours to say 25% with coupon code GP25.

Comments

Culture

Bill Clinton on Jeffrey Epstein Island, Victim Claims

Published

on

Former President Bill Clinton was seen with two women on Jeffrey Epstein’s “pedophile island,” according to Virgina Roberts.

In newly unsealed documents, Virgina Roberts directly implicated Clinton in an April, 2011 interview. (You can read her full interview here at this link.)

The relevant except says:

When you say you you asked him why is Bill Clinton here, where was here?

Roberts: On the island.

JS: When you were present with Jeffrey Epstein and Bill Clinton on the island, who else was there?

Roberts: Ghislaine, Emmy, and there was two young girls that I could identify. I never really knew them well anyways. It was just 2 girls from New York.

JS: And were all of you staying at Jeffrey’s house on the island including Bill Clinton?

Roberts: That’s correct.

He had about 4 or 5 different villas on his island separate from the main house, and we all stayed in the villas.

JS: Were sexual orgies a regular occurrences at the island of Jeffrey’s house? Roberts: Yes.

 

 

Bill Clinton is directly implicated by an eyewitness in the Jeffrey Epstein sex trafficking ring.

Continue Reading

Culture

Jim Jordan Sells Out Conservatives to Big Tech (Read the Confidential Memo in Full)

Published

on

Labelled “Confidential,” the Jim Jordan Memo is something you’re not supposed to see.

Cernovich Media has obtained this Memo and is posted it in full.

Read the Jim Jordan Antitrust Memo here:

Highlights of Jim Jordan’s Antitrust Memo

  • The Memo gives Republican talking points needed to defend Google, Apple, Amazon, and Facebook.
  • The Jim Jordan Memo is clear. Zero antitrust action against Apple, Google, or Amazon will be supported by the GOP, and the memo is loaded with talking points defending Big Tech’s monopoly power.
  • “Even if this hearing suggests that Google, Amazon, Apple, or Facebook have acted unlawfully, that would not necessarily mean underlying antitrust law needs an overhaul.”

Watch my Video Report of the Jim Jordan Antitrust Memo here:

 

 

Continue Reading

Culture

Cigars, Networking, and Mentorship

Published

on

My brother Dr. Melvin Armstrong Jr. and I will be hosting a private event for his non-profit, which pairs at-risk teens with mentors. (Get tickets here.)

Ticket includes dinner, cigar, and upscale conversation in a fantastic venue.

Come out, ask me anything, hear some talks, and vibe. If you’ve attended a previous event, you don’t need a hard sell. (And frankly these tickets will go fast as we are capped at 20 people.)

If price is an issue, keep in mind that 100% of ticket sales will go to Dr. Armstrong’s non-profit and contributions are tax-deductible. (As always get with your accountant with receipts.)

Tickets are available here.

Continue Reading

Trending

shares
Read previous post:
One Quick Trick that Will Change Your Thinking Forever

What if you could make one minor update to your thought processes, using one quick trick? You can. When you...

Close